Fraudulent 'naturopathic' Hoover doctor to serve 6 years

Isabell Kasari GervaisA claimed "naturopathic" doctor was sentenced to more than six years in prison for defrauding patients at her Hoover clinic, the Department of Justice announced Tuesday.    

Isabell Kasari Gervais, who operated a clinic called Euro Med Klinic in Hoover, last year pleaded guilty to one count of wire fraud affecting a financial institution, one count of aggravated identity theft, and one count of making false statements before U.S. District Court Judge Madeline Hughes Haikala.

She was sentenced to serve six years and three months in Alabama prison for the crimes, according to the sentencing memo made public Tuesday. Last year, she was ordered to forfeit $108,146 as proceeds of her illegal activity.

Over the last 15 years, she operated several different clinics in Alabama, Georgia, Arkansas, and Kansas using both her name and different aliases. The clinics included Sagewood Medical Clinic in Montgomery, the Chiron Clinic in Marietta, Ga., and DRI Enterprises in Atlanta.

She was investigated by both the Alabama and Arkansas medical boards and was prosecuted by Arkansas authorities.

The sentencing memo said Gervais opened Euro Med Klinic in Hoover in 2015 under a false name and lied about having medical degrees and a medical license, the sentencing memo states.

She told her patients that she was licensed to practice medicine "anywhere in the world," claimed she could provide treatments for cancer and provide various medical services including DNA tests that she did not have the technology to do, the sentencing memo reads. Alabama does not license naturopathic physicians, the memo claims.

Gervais also used one of her patients' credit card without their consent and used another patient's identity to set up a post office box, records show.

Her stretch of frauds ended in November 2015 when she was pulled over by a Hoover police officer, offered an ID she stole from a client, but provided a social security number that did not match the name listed on the ID. She was then arrested on warrants from Arkansas.

She was arrested in Arkansas in March, after being indicted on the federal charges in February.

The maximum penalty for wire fraud affecting a financial institution is 30 years in prison and a $1 million fine; the sentence for aggravated identity fraud is a two-year mandatory minimum prison sentence; and the maximum penalty for making a false statement is five years in prison and a $250,000 fine.

The U.S. Postal Inspection Service investigated the case, and Assistant U.S. Attorney Erica Barnes prosecuted.



 

 

 

Article From:- https://www.al.com

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